S5E6: John Huffington: Drug Deals, A Double Death Sentence & Over 3 Decades In Prison

Episode of: Wrongful Conviction with Jason Flom

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Apr 9, 20181h 2m | se5 : e6
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S5E6: John Huffington: Drug Deals, A Double Death Sentence & Over 3 Decades In Prison
Apr 9 '181h 2m | se5e6
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John Huffington spent 32 years in the Maryland Prison System—10 of which were on Death Row—after being wrongfully convicted of a 1981 double murder. Previously, juries twice convicted Mr. Huffington of first-degree murder in the deaths of Diane Becker and Joseph Hudson. The first trial, in 1981, occurred in Caroline County and Mr. Huffington was later granted a new trial due to evidence improperly introduced by the State. The second trial took place in Frederick County in 1983. He faced the death penalty after both convictions, but his sentence was later commuted to two life terms in prison. Since his first trial, Mr. Huffington had filed multiple appeals at the state and federal levels, challenging the state’s case against him. In 2013, as the result of newly discovered DNA evidence that demonstrated that hairs discovered at the crime scene were not Mr. Huffington's, the Circuit Court for Frederick County, MD, granted him a Writ of Actual Innocence and vacated his murder convictions, and John Huffington was released from prison on bond. The faulty evidence came from an FBI lab that has been forced to acknowledge widespread mismanagement and false testimony. The Washington Post published an article in 2015 that “[t]he Justice Department and FBI…formally acknowledged that nearly every examiner in an elite FBI forensic unit gave flawed testimony in almost all trials in which they offered evidence against criminal defendants over more than a two-decade period before 2000.” Flawed forensic testimony was given in 257 of the 268 trials in which hair evidence was used, and John Huffington’s trial was one of them. Since his release from prison, Mr. Huffington has been a tireless advocate for the re-entry community, and his work has been recognized by Baltimore City leaders, including State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby. He is now serving as the Director of Workforce Development for Living Classrooms Foundation, where he manages the workforce development department and its programming with 18 staff members and a $2 million budget. As part of his role, he manages Project SERVE, the same job-training program in which he enrolled upon being released from incarceration.


Instagram @huffingtonjohn

Twitter @huffingtonjohn 


Please also link to the foundation where he works: https://livingclassrooms.org/


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